Tiffany Logan

Tiffany Logan

paintings

Tiffany is best known for her semi-abstract paintings of still life subjects on canvas using various media such as pages from a old novels and gold leaf. Tiffany was born in Deal on the Kent coast and always had an interest in the arts and a childhood dream was to be an artist. She qualified as an art teacher in 1993 and enjoyed teaching for over fifteen years in comprehensive and private schools in Sussex, North London, Essex and Kent. She gained her degree in Cardiff and her P.G.C.E. at John Moore’s University. In 2007 she finally realised her dream when she became a full-time artist. She has exhibited in London’s Mall Galleries and Candid Arts Gallery in Angel, Islington and is currently represented by galleries in Oxfordshire, Hertfordshire and Zurich. Tiffany is a member of the Hitchin Art Hub and the Artist’s Network Bedfordshire, and now lives in Bedfordshire where she paints in her studio at the bottom of her garden and teaches workshops.

Tiffany is drawn to anything worn and weathered such as an old door with peeling paint, a rusted groin by the sea, or any interesting surfaces created by natural means. Man’s control has gone, and nature has become the artist. That combined with an early love of the work of Gustav Klimt whose use of reduced spatial depth lead her to focus on the surface of the canvas rather than depth and realism. Not to mention the introduction of gold leaf with which her love affair continues. Tiffany tends to work in a semi abstract way, intuitively using layers of colour to distort and change her subject. In her paintings she uses a range of media including acrylic paint, gold leaf and pages from old books. Tiffany loves the sense of freedom while painting - she likes to start off with chaos and then gradually bring in order to her work. She doesn't aim for reality - but something just beyond what we can see. Tiffany works in layers and tends to cover up parts of the painting by working into the negative space. She has always adored children’s drawings - that stage before self-doubt creeps in which is probably why she is such a fan of the “blind contour” drawing method as it takes some of the control out of her work.

Woburn Mosaic Exhibitions

paintings